Cylinder Snapping

Did you know that there are approximately 22 million doors across the UK that could be at risk to lock snapping?

So what is lock snapping?

Cylinder SnappingLock snapping involves snapping the lock cylinder in two, by applying force, and removing the outside part to expose the lock mechanism. Doing so provides access to the mechanism, allowing the door to be unlocked.” (Yale)

In order to snap a lock an intruder will often use makeshift tools that can be easily found around the house. Worryingly this technique doesn’t require experience or skill, just brute force.

Euro profile locks (better known as Euro Cylinders) are found in the majority of uPVC doors and are the most likely targets for this type of forced entry.

What can I do to prevent being a victim of lock snapping?

In order to combat lock snapping simply call a local locksmith to upgrade your cylinder to one that is specifically designed to prevent this method of attack, ideally a cylinder that meets the TS007 3 star standard. If possible when having your lock upgraded have your new cylinder fitted in conjunction with a high security mechanism and handle set.

Keeping you secure with ABS High Security Euro Cylinders…

All of our local locksmiths are able to supply and fit an ABS High Security Euro Cylinder, to ensure your uPVC or double glazed doors are not only meeting your home insurance requirements but are also ultimately secured for your peace of mind when it comes to your home security. The ABS High Security Euro Cylinder is the only security cylinder currently on the market which has a TS007 3 star rating, SS312 Sold Secure Diamond Accredited and Secured by Design Accreditation combined.

Speak to one of the Keytek® Team today on 0800 035 0451 to find out more about having your cylinder upgraded to the 3 star versions.

Locksmith Jargon Buster

Calling an emergency locksmith in any situation can be a stressful time and can often lead to confusion, especially if you don’t understand what the local locksmith is trying to explain!

Whether you are locked out of your home or require your locks to be upgraded, when calling a local locksmith you want to be sure that you understand any industry specific/technical jargon used by the locksmith in order to avoid any miscommunication.

Generally when booking a locksmith you will be asked a few questions about the door and the lock itself and whether your situation requires an emergency locksmith or not.

In order to help you fully understand the terms that are often used by a local locksmith we have put together the following locksmith jargon buster, which can be downloaded by clicking the image below…

Locksmith Jargon Buster

Download our locksmith jargon buster by clicking the image above to ensure you fully understand the terms used by a local locksmith so that when you do require an Engineer you will be confident that you understand exactly what is being done onsite.

A full breakdown of the locksmith jargon buster can be found below:

Wooden Doors:

Back Plate – A plate that fits directly to the door to provide a solid fastening for the hardware to be fitted to.

Bolt/Deadbolt  –

A solid piece of metal that protrudes from the Forend of the lock into a ‘keep’ fitted on the frame.

British Standard/BS3621 – The BS3621 signifies that a lock has been tested by the British Standards Institute and has met all of the relevant standards. It is widely recognised by the public and the majority of UK insurers as a sign of quality.

Cam Lock –

A cylinder type lock that operates a tail to engage with the locking mechanism. Commonly fitted to furniture or basic safes.

Closed Shackle Padlock –

A padlock which has been manufactured with the shackle (the locking ‘loop’) largely encased within the main body.

Combination/digital locks

– A keyless lock that uses a chosen combination of numbers or letters to be input before it releases.

Cylinder

– The key operated part of most locking systems. Available in many formats for example; Euro profile, Rim type, Oval.

Door viewer –

A device that allows the person inside of a property to view the person on the outside of the property through the door.

Double Locking –

A function that offers an extra locking facility on top of the standard operation.

Escutcheon –

The plate or guard normally fixed over the keyway of a lock to protect it from the elements and offer an aesthetically pleasing finish.

Face Plate –

A plate fitted to the front profile of the lock to provide an aesthetically pleasing finish and information about the lock behind it.

Furniture –

Any hardware fitted to a door other than the lock itself, for example handles or a door knocker.

Hinge Bolts –

Small round lugs that are drilled into the spine of a door and engage into keeps in the frame when the door is closed. Designed to prevent a door being lifted from its hinges and removed unless open.

Hook Bolts –

Similar in principal to dead bolts, although for added security hook bolts pivot out of the case and swing up or down into the frame.

Latch –

Usually found used in conjunction with a number of other locking points (such as deadbolts).

Master Key –

A key that is designed to be able to open more than one lock.

Mortice Lock –

A lock that is fitted within a pocket cut into the door. When the door is closed the only visible parts are the keyways from both sides of the door.

Night Latch –

A lock operated by a rim style cylinder. The lock is fitted to the back of the door and is operable by use of a handle from the inside. Available in many different sizes and security ratings.

Rim Cylinder –

A cylinder used to operate a Nightlatch.

Sash Lock –

Most commonly a mortice style lock that also utilises a latch operated by a handle.

Shackle –

The metal ‘loop’ at the top of the Padlock that fits through the eye of a hasp.

Shoot Bolt –

A bolt designed to bridge the gap between the door and the frame, widely used as extra security.

Spindle –

A square bar that runs between two handles, passing through the lock body itself to allow the latch to be retracted when a handle is operated.

Snib –

The small button or sliding button fitted most commonly to night latches to allow the latch to be held in position.

Suite (Locks) –

More than one lock manufactured in sequence or to a specific non-random pattern.

Thumb Turn

– A knob fitted to the inside of a euro profile cylinder in place of the internal Key way to allow easy or quick egress.

uPVC Doors: 

 

British Standard/BS3621 –

The BS3621 signifies that a lock has been tested by the British Standards Institute and has met all of the relevant standards. It is widely recognised by the public and the majority of UK insurers as a sign of quality.

Cylinder –

The key operated part of most locking systems. Available in many formats, Euro profile, Rim type, Oval.

Anti Snap Cylinder –

A cylinder specifically designed to help prevent cylinder or lock snapping. The ABS High Security Euro Cylinder is the only security cylinder currently on the market which has a TS007 3 star rating, SS312 Sold Secure Diamond Accredited and Secured by Design Accreditation combined.

Deadbolt –

A solid bolt that protrudes from the Forend of the lock into the ‘Keep’ fitted on the door frame.

Double Locking –

A function that offers an extra locking facility on top of the standard operation.

Furniture –

Any hardware fitted to a door other than the lock itself. Handles, door knocker etc.

Hook Bolts –

Similar in principal to dead bolts, although for added security hook bolts pivot out of the case and swing up or down into the frame.

Latch –

Usually found used in conjunction with a number of other locking points (such as deadbolts).

Spindle –

A square bar that runs between two handles, passing through the lock body itself to allow the latch to be retracted when a handle is operated.

Thumb Turn –

A euro profile cylinder in place of the internal Key way to allow easy or quick egress.

Hinge Bolts –

Small round lugs that are drill into the spine of a door and engage into keeps in the frame when the door is closed. Designed to prevent a door being lifted from its hinges and removed unless open.

Suite (Locks) –

More than one lock manufactured in sequence or to a specific non-random pattern.

Master Key –

A key that is designed to be able to open more than one lock. 

Additional Security:

British Standard/BS3621 –

The BS3621 signifies that a lock has been tested by the British Standards Institute and has met all of the relevant standards. It is widely recognised by the public and the majority of UK insurers as a sign of quality.

Closed Shackle Padlock –

A padlock which has been manufactured with the shackle (the locking ‘loop’) largely encased within the main body.

Door viewer –

A device that allows the person inside of a property to view the person on the outside of the property through the door.

Shoot Bolt –

A bolt designed to bridge the gap between the door and the frame, widely used as extra security.

Sash Jammer –

A small piece of metal with a pivoting arm that bridges the gap between the frame and sash of a door or window. This is fitted to help prevent doors/windows from being jimmied open.

Door Chains and limiters –

A small chain that is attached to the door frame which attaches to a track on the door to prevent any unwanted visitors from entering a house after the door has been opened.

Key Safe –

A strong mechanical box usually with a digital pad that is fitted externally to a home which is used to secure keys for an external door.

How to prevent distraction burglary

What is distraction burglary?

Distraction burglary is when an intruder calls at your home posing as a tradesman or someone asking for your help with something. They will make up any kind of story in order to gain entry to your home as they have only one intention, to steal!

Common lies an intruder will say to convince you to let them into your home:

  • “I’m from the ‘Water Board’, there’s a leak down the road I need to check your water supply.” – Don’t be fooled this will never be true as the phrase ‘water board’ is no longer a phrase used by legitimate organisations.
  • “I need to read your meter.” – Always check with your utility supplier that this is a legitimate representative before you let them and check that they carry identification. Some suppliers operate a password scheme.
  • “We’re the police, we’ve caught a burglar, we think he’s stolen your cash and we need to check your money is safe.” – A genuine police officer will never do this. Under no circumstances should you let them into your home.

 

No ID? No way!

A genuine representative or trader will always be more than happy to show you their identification. An ID card will confirm who they are and the company they work for. If they refuse to show you their ID or stop you from examining it more carefully, shut the door and phone the police on 999 immediately. Police across the UK are urging members of the public to report any rogue traders that may be operating in your local area to reduce the risk of doorstep crime and distraction burglary.

Download our ‘Bogus Caller Initiative’ sign by clicking the image below to deter rogue traders or a potential intruder… 

No ID No Way sign

Rogue Traders – Do’s and Don’ts

  • Don’t ever go to a bank or cash point with a trader; legitimate traders would never do this!
  • Don’t allow anyone to pressure you into agreeing to have work carried out. If you ask them to leave and they don’t, call the police dial 999.
  • Do discuss any work you feel needs carrying out on your property with a relative or friend who can help you find a reputable trader.

If you suspect a bogus caller call 999 immediately and report it to the police.
(Source: Wycombe District Council)

Book a CRB checked local locksmith by calling 0800 035 0451 or visiting keytek.co.uk

Master Suites, new office and business security resolutions!

It’s time to be more security conscious…

As part of your New Year’s resolutions for 2015 it may be worth thinking about being more security conscious when it comes to the security of your business or office.

Why not upgrade your office and business security by having a Master Suite system fitted by a local locksmith!

What is a Master Suite?

A Master Key suite is a state of the art system designed for operational convenience. It gives designated key holders access to specific areas or buildings, and the master key holder access to all locks on the suite.

How does a Master Suite work?

Upgrade the security of your office- business with a master suite

Alternative options…

Construction Master Keyring

This function enables constructers (builders) to issue a construction key that will operate all the cylinders under the system, once the property has been handed over to the tenant/owner the construction key is locked out once the cylinder is operated by the tenant/owners key. This system eliminates the need for multiple keys during the build process.

Key Life or Landlords Systems

This system is designed to minimise the changing of door cylinders when tenants leave the property (for whatever reason) but do not return all copies of the key to the landlord. Key changes are designed into the cylinder so when a tenant leaves, the next tenant key once operated in the cylinder will lock out the previous tenant’s key. Up to 4 key lives can be built into the cylinder. This type of arrangement is not normally under a master key as most landlords are not happy to hold master keys to tenant’s properties.

All systems or suites described on this page will come with restricted keys therefore any additional keys required will need to be cut by the initial supplier. Anyone in possession of these restricted keys will not be able to get any additional keys cut unless they have authorisation to do so, giving you added peace of mind when it comes to the security of your business.

Business and Office Security Tips

  • Be aware of anyone who visits your office or business. Install a visitors book in your main reception or entrance and ask anyone who isn’t an employee to sign in and sign out, you may want to consider time of arrival/departure and car registration.
  • Check the ID of any tradesmen/suppliers.
  • Ensure all valuables such as purses, wallets or mobile phones are not left in plain sight of a passerby.
  • Never leave a laptop in an unlocked office, meeting area or anywhere that is not secure.
  • Keep your key fob or card on your person at all times and don’t loan it to other members of staff.
  • Lock your computer when you are away from your desk to avoid being a victim of any fraudulent activity.
  • Back up and encrypt any data that may be important and sensitive.
  • Ensure all staff are using strong and multiple passwords.
  • If your office or business has a staff car park ensure no valuables are left in any vehicles.
  • Draw any blinds or curtains once everyone has finished for the day to ensure any valuables/office equipment can’t be seen by any passersby.
  • Make sure that all windows and doors are locked before leaving.