Taking Care of your Car in the Heat

We tend to travel more in the summer; summer holidays, beach trips, weekends away etc. But the scorching temperatures can do bad things to your car. Read through our tips to keep your car running during the summer months.

driving into sunset

Check the Tyre Pressure

This is good to do all year round, however the temperature can affect the air pressure in your tyres. So if the temperature does rise then you need to make sure they stay properly inflated. You don’t need to take your car to a mechanic to check the pressure. Air pressure gauges are available at most garages, as well as air pumps to re-inflate them.

 

Your Car Battery

 

The heat of the summer months can have a negative effect on your car’s battery. You can’t do much about the temperature but you can take steps to make sure your battery doesn’t deteriorate. The best way to do this is to have your car serviced regularly to make sure the battery has not degraded and has no corrosion. The heat can cause the battery fluid to evaporate and this can damage the internal structure of the battery.

Oil

The engine needs as much lubrication as it can get when it’s hot, so make sure you keep your oil levels topped up. If you are driving extra miles in the summer you may need to change the oil more frequently.

 

The Air Conditioning

Air con is a god send in the hot weather, so make its working by having it serviced regularly! Replacing the air filter and cleaning out any clogged vents is also a good way to keep your air con working at full capacity.

Staying Safe at Pride Events

 

In the UK June is Pride month. There will be lots of activities going on not just in London but all around the country. These events are usually fun filled and a great way to spend a day. However going to an event where 1000s of people will be attending always has its risks. Read our tips below to make sure you can make the most out of a Pride event and keep yourself safe.

  • Go and stick with a group you know and trust.

Events like this are always more fun in groups, so if you and your friends plan on going STICK TOGETHER. With potentially thousands of people piling into the same area it’s easy to get separated. It’s a good idea to discuss a pre-arranged meeting spot that you can go to if you do get lost. ‘Under the Pride flag’ is not a specific enough place. Pick somewhere memorable and stationary.

If this is your first Pride event then it advisable to go with people you know well and trust, friends you’ve known for years are more likely to look for you if you get lost.

  • Tell someone where you will be.

Yes, even if you are a fully-fledged adult, tell someone where you are going. If you are under 18 then, you might tell your parents or an adult that you trust. Try and check in with them, a text here and there just to let them know what you’re up to. It’s advisable to arrange a time that you will call them, maybe after the parade. This is to ensure that if you do get into trouble someone is aware of roughly where you are.

On a side note, make sure your phone as sufficient battery, so you can use it in an emergency.

 

  • Know your limits.

We cannot preach that you shouldn’t drink at these events, but we can preach to know your limits. The safety aspect of holding on to your faculties are obvious, the majority of Pride festivals are held outside, so being paralytic on a road is just asking for trouble. You are also surrounded by people you don’t know, your friends might look after you if are drunk, but at any large event there is always a risk that someone could take advantage of your venerable state. Also you don’t want to miss out on all the activities at Pride because you have to be taken home.

 

  • Be careful with your money.

Unfortunately, at events like these, there are bound to be pick pockets. Try and take a suitable bag and secure any belongings. Cash and cards should be concealed in any compartments that your bag might have. It is always a good idea to keep some money separate from the rest, just in case you are the victim of a pick pocket or lose your wallet or purse.

 

  • Plan how you are getting home.

It goes without saying that you shouldn’t drink and drive. But you need to be prepared on how you will get yourself home. If you know what time you will be ready to leave, book a taxi and make sure you have the money for it. If you are getting the train, be sure to know what time the last one is so you don’t get stranded. It doesn’t matter if you are getting a taxi, catching the train, getting the bus or walking; make sure you include a friend. There is safety in numbers and doesn’t matter what your gender is. Pride events can attract certain people who will want to cause trouble with anyone who has been involved in the festivities, so stick with a buddy.

 

  • Plan for the weather.

It’s England in June, so the weather could literally be anything, so plan for any eventuality. If it’s looking like a sunny day then make sure you pack and wear sun cream. Also try and take some water, as it’s easy to become dehydrated when it’s sunny and you’re moving around a lot. On the other hand, if it looks like a wet and cold day, make sure you wear appropriate clothing. You may have planned out the perfect outfit and accessories, but you’re going to regret your outfit choice if it hails and you’re in summer gear!

 

  • Think about your feet.

If the weather is hot it may be tempting to wear flip flops all day, but that might not be the best option. Putting aside the hygienic issues that come with having almost bare feet on any city pavement, there is a safety issue as well. There could be broken glass on the floor that could cut you, and with thousands of people all taking part or walking in a parade, you could break some toes getting stood on. If you are going to be on your feet all day then try and wear footwear that is supportive and comfortable.  You don’t want your day and night ruined by blisters and painful toes.

 

We hope you enjoy any Pride event you go to this month, but just remember to keep yourself safe.

http://www.teensource.org/blog/2011/06/25-pride-week-dos-and-donts