Local Heroes on International Women’s Day

One of our engineers Pip is featured in this fabulous article from British Gas Local Heroes about being a woman in the trade industry. To read the full article visit the Local Heroes Website

Tradesman? Tradeswoman? Tradesperson.

In celebration of International Women’s Day today we’ve been speaking to some of the fantastic female tradespeople on our platform. It’s fair to say that we operate in a heavily male-dominated industry. Women make up just 6% of all people in skilled trades, while only 1% of electricians are female. So, we were keen to speak to our female Heroes about their experiences and whether they see the split between men and women in the industry balancing out anytime soon.

“Women make up just 6% of all people in skilled trades, while only 1% of electricians are female.”

Customers are more trusting of women

Overwhelmingly (and promisingly!) our female Heroes talked about the positive experiences they’ve had in customers’ homes. Sam Gregory, who works for a handyman company (a handywoman?), told us “some people comment that it’s a bit odd having a woman come to quote for the work, but some people say they’d prefer a woman to do the job. Especially other women and older customers who are nervous about strangers coming into their home. It’s all about trust”

“Single women are often relieved to see I’m a woman”

Pip Harris, locksmith

Pip Harris, a locksmith, agreed that “single women are often relieved to see I’m a woman”. She explained that when people are locked out of their homes they’re often in an emotional state, and some feel more relaxed that it’s a woman helping them out in this time of need.

Why don’t more girls become tradespeople?

Aside from a few negative experiences on site, our female Heroes spoke enthusiastically about how they enjoy their jobs and the variety of work they undertake. So, what do they see as holding back young women from entering into skilled trades? “Some girls might not go into these trades because they’re nervous, scared or embarrassed as they think there’s a stigma that it’s a man’s job”, Kari speculated.

“Some girls might not go into these trades because they’re nervous, scared or embarrassed as they think there’s a stigma that it’s a man’s job”

Kari, drainage engineer

Kari herself went into hairdressing after she left school because she was scared of what people might think; “as I got older I didn’t care as much what people think and just wanted to do what makes me happy”.

 

We certainly hope that this will encourage more women to feel more confident about joining the industry, and we’d like to say massive thanks to all our female Heroes who work tirelessly to help customers in their homes.

We’re always looking for quality tradespeople to sign up to Local Heroes, and would love more women to join us.

We have not shown the whole article on our page, to read the article in its entirety visit Local Heroes.

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